Going to yard sales this weekend? Here are some helpful tips.

My parents spend most Saturday mornings on the yard sale circuit. Trust me, it’s a thing. I’m a fan myself although I don’t go as often as they do. Maybe someday. My husband and I did make a pit stop to the annual ten-mile yard sale in Cornville on our way up to The Forks last spring. It’s one of those must do destinations for yard sale aficionados.

While we never did find the main drag, we spent a few enjoyable hours poking around some of the side roads leading up to the sale as we passed through Skowhegan. I even scored a $5 pair of ice skates and a $2 DVD of The Purge so the hunt was successful. Although after watching the Purge, I’m not sure it was a complete win.

This weekend marks the 35th anniversary of the 10 mile yard sale. The weather isn’t looking promising but that doesn’t stop the bargain hunters. The sale goes on rain or shine.

Thinking of going to a few yard sales? Here are some things to keep in mind if you do:

  • Hydrate. Be sure to bring water with you on the trip. It’s easy to lose track of time when wandering through tables of treasures. Snacks are always good too.
  • Bring Bug Spray and Sunscreen. Or, bring an umbrella and mud boots. Keep an eye on the weather and adjust accordingly.
  • Wear a Hat. I actually forgot this one on our trip, but serendipity stepped in and I found someone selling a new one with tags for $.50. Perfect timing!
  • Carry Small Bills and Change. There’s nothing worse than finding that must have item but the seller can’t make change.
  • Take a Reusable Shopping Bag. You need to be able to carry all your purchases.
  • Buy Only What You Need. The prices can be amazing at yard sales, but it’s not a bargain if you don’t need it.
  • Prepare for Lemonade Stands and Bake Sales. I always bringing a little extra cash to buy from the cutest little entrepreneurs out there.
  • Barter only if overpriced. This is a personal choice. I’m not a fan of haggling unless I truly feel something is overpriced by yard sale standards. I’ve been on the other side of yard sales. They are a lot of work and generally things are already priced incredibly low.
  • Know Your Sizes. If you’re looking for something for a specific space or place in your home, write down the sizes and bring a measuring tape. Using your best guess may work but it’s risky.
  • Think Creatively. My favorite part of going to tag sales is finding something that can be re-purposed or reused in a new way.

There are many other tips and tricks to successful yard sale excursions but there’s truly only one tip that you need to know. Have fun!

Do you like to go to yard sales?

#AtoZChallenge | Y is for Yarmouth and an Island Hike at Littlejohn Island Preserve

There are over 4,600 islands off the Maine coast. Some are more remote than others. In winter, all are a little quieter.

Some islands are actually accessible by road including two off the coast of Yarmouth: Cousins and Littlejohn Islands. Littlejohn Island has a preserve that includes a hiking trail with scenic views of Casco Bay.

We actually hiked the trail a few days into spring so the snow cover was spotty but the wind chill was intense making it feel like we were still in winter. We hiked late on a Sunday afternoon which probably impacted the cooler temperatures. Continue reading

#AtoZChallenge | V is for Views of the Artist’s Bridge in Newry Maine

Covered bridges bring up feelings of nostalgia as your mind wanders back to an earlier time. They are the poster child for idyllic countryside drives and simpler times. Maine has nine covered bridges remaining according to the Maine Department of Transportation site on historic covered bridges.

Covered bridges at the center of a snow-covered scene are a quintessential New England image. While covered bridges are not specifically a winter thing, they do look even more lovely painted in white.  Continue reading

Winter

#AtoZChallenge | T is for Trees and Trail Markers

In the winter, when the trees have shed their leaves and all that remains are the bare branches some unique, interesting natural sculptures begin to appear. I’m drawn to trees that are different and I don’t think I’m alone because many of the trail markers that I see on our hikes are placed on the most unique trees.

Some trail markers are painted on to the trees while others are actual tags that are attached and as we’ve grown in our hiking experience we’ve gotten a lot better at spotting them. Fortunately, at least for us, it seems to be a little easier in the winter which is good because the actual trail can be more challenging to find when the ground is covered in snow and you can’t always trust the trampled path of those that went before you. Sometimes they wander off the main trail so you need to rely on your trail markers. Continue reading

#AtoZChallenge | R is for a Rocky Waterfall and Trekking Through the Snow

The sign letting us know we were only 1,000 feet from the entrance to Screw Auger Falls prompted us to slow down. We’d been to the falls before which I blogged about in my post Hiking Maine | Following in the path of the Ultimate Maine Waterfalls Road Trip so we had a general sense of where we were going. As we got closer, the lack of a break in the snowbank confused us until we saw the sign for the entrance resting on top. Apparently the parking lot to the falls is not open in the winter.

We debated continuing onto our next destination but knew the falls were only a short distance from the entrance so we pulled the car onto the shoulder and parked. After scrambling over the snow bank, we saw a single row of footprints leading in the general direction of the falls. I mirrored the steps and began the short hike to the falls. Occasionally, my weight would push through the top layer of snow plunging my leg into the unknown and slowing down our progress. We proceeded with caution. Continue reading