Hiking Maine | A walk along the ocean at Goose Rocks Beach

Parking in the summer can be challenging at Goose Rocks Beach in Kennebunkport. You need a parking pass and demand generally exceeds supply.  But, in the spring, it is less busy but no less beautiful.

Below are a few pictures from our recent spring hike to Goose Rocks Beach.

Spring inland hikes can be challenging. As I talked about in my earlier post, Hiking Maine | The Hirundo Wildlife Refuge Trail the mosquitoes are fierce and detract from the experience.

The best option during this time of year is to stick to the coast and Goose Rocks Beach was a great option.

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Hiking Maine | Hirundo Wildlife Refuge Trail

Spring hikes can be beautiful but challenging.  As soon as you pause, you are swarmed with mosquitoes. While the bug spray keeps the biting at bay, it is still distracting to have hundreds of mosquitoes buzzing around your face as you’re trying to take a sip of water. The mosquitoes are especially thick in forest hikes with nearby water sources.

So, of course, this past weekend we decided to head to the Hirundo Wildlife Refuge. The trail we picked starts off near a stagnant pond before heading deeper into the woods and then turning along a stream. No surprise the mosquitoes were bad but at least the views were beautiful.

For the next month or so, we’ll be sticking to coastal hikes where there are less mosquitoes. I do miss the bug free joy of our winter hikes but know that spring is leading to warmer, beautiful days to come. There is plenty of fun to be had in Maine in the summer.


things to know
Place Hirundo Wildlife Refuge
Address 1107 W Old Town Rd, Old Town, ME 04468
Website Hirundo Wildlife Refuge
Favorite ♥ Water Reviews

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Hiking Maine | A Visit to a Salt Marsh at Cutts Island Trail

As winter was winding down, we headed south to the Cutts Island Trail which is part of the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge. It is a short, two-mile circular hike by a salt marsh.

The first part of the trail follows along Chauncey Creek and was easy to maneuver. It is not a strenuous hike. It leads to beautiful views of the marsh. Somehow, even though it’s a loop trail we did struggle to stay on the return part of the trail.

As we followed along with what we thougth was the trail, we noticed the growth around us was getting a little higher and when we tried to get back on track we couldn’t find the trail markers. Since it was a loop in a fairly compact space, there was no fear of wandering for too long but we did end up hiking through an overgrown, swampy patch until we finally connected back with the original trail but not until we saw way more animal scat than I would have expected for such a well traveled area.

Eventually we reconnected with the trail and finsihed the hike before heading to nearby Tributary Brewing Company for a post hike drink.

This is a nice, short hike with gorgeous views of the salt marsh. It’s probably a really beautiful trail in the summer when things are a bit greener and it might be easier to stay on the trail then too.


things to know
Place Cutts Island Trail
Address Cutts Island Lane, Kittery, Maine 3905
Website All Trails: Cutts Island Trail
Favorite ♥ Views of the Marsh

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#AtoZChallenge | Y is for Yarmouth and an Island Hike at Littlejohn Island Preserve

There are over 4,600 islands off the Maine coast. Some are more remote than others. In winter, all are a little quieter.

Some islands are actually accessible by road including two off the coast of Yarmouth: Cousins and Littlejohn Islands. Littlejohn Island has a preserve that includes a hiking trail with scenic views of Casco Bay.

We actually hiked the trail a few days into spring so the snow cover was spotty but the wind chill was intense making it feel like we were still in winter. We hiked late on a Sunday afternoon which probably impacted the cooler temperatures. Continue reading

Winter

#AtoZChallenge | T is for Trees and Trail Markers

In the winter, when the trees have shed their leaves and all that remains are the bare branches some unique, interesting natural sculptures begin to appear. I’m drawn to trees that are different and I don’t think I’m alone because many of the trail markers that I see on our hikes are placed on the most unique trees.

Some trail markers are painted on to the trees while others are actual tags that are attached and as we’ve grown in our hiking experience we’ve gotten a lot better at spotting them. Fortunately, at least for us, it seems to be a little easier in the winter which is good because the actual trail can be more challenging to find when the ground is covered in snow and you can’t always trust the trampled path of those that went before you. Sometimes they wander off the main trail so you need to rely on your trail markers. Continue reading