Winter

#AtoZChallenge | T is for Trees and Trail Markers

In the winter, when the trees have shed their leaves and all that remains are the bare branches some unique, interesting natural sculptures begin to appear. I’m drawn to trees that are different and I don’t think I’m alone because many of the trail markers that I see on our hikes are placed on the most unique trees.

Some trail markers are painted on to the trees while others are actual tags that are attached and as we’ve grown in our hiking experience we’ve gotten a lot better at spotting them. Fortunately, at least for us, it seems to be a little easier in the winter which is good because the actual trail can be more challenging to find when the ground is covered in snow and you can’t always trust the trampled path of those that went before you. Sometimes they wander off the main trail so you need to rely on your trail markers. Continue reading

#AtoZChallenge | R is for a Rocky Waterfall and Trekking Through the Snow

The sign letting us know we were only 1,000 feet from the entrance to Screw Auger Falls prompted us to slow down. We’d been to the falls before which I blogged about in my post Hiking Maine | Following in the path of the Ultimate Maine Waterfalls Road Trip so we had a general sense of where we were going. As we got closer, the lack of a break in the snowbank confused us until we saw the sign for the entrance resting on top. Apparently the parking lot to the falls is not open in the winter.

We debated continuing onto our next destination but knew the falls were only a short distance from the entrance so we pulled the car onto the shoulder and parked. After scrambling over the snow bank, we saw a single row of footprints leading in the general direction of the falls. I mirrored the steps and began the short hike to the falls. Occasionally, my weight would push through the top layer of snow plunging my leg into the unknown and slowing down our progress. We proceeded with caution. Continue reading

#AtoZChallenge | N is for the Noyes Trail in Norway and Skiing Past Tense

I use to ski. If there were a way to make that statement not just past tense, but past-past tense it would be more accurate. It has been at least thirty-five years since I skied last but I have fond memories of being on the slopes even if my first attempt did result in frostbite. Fortunately, my toes thawed.

My childhood best friend’s family skied every weekend and I was lucky enough to tag along on many trips to the ski resort. There was also an active ski club in my high school. Every Friday night, we headed to the mountain. Skiing is big in Maine. Continue reading

#AtoZChallenge | M is for Mist and a Magical Transformation

Winter mist is probably my favorite winter scene. It arrives unexpectedly and makes everything it touches eerie and surreal.

“Mist is tiny droplets of water hanging in the air. These droplets form when warmer water in the air is rapidly cooled, causing it to change from invisible gas to tiny visible water droplets.”1

When the conditions are right, it creates a magical landscape. It also has this amazing way of draining color from the scene. All my photos in this post are color but the mist seems to wash most of the color away leaving behind unsaturated wondrous images.

Continue reading

#AtoZChallenge | H is for Hidden Under the Snow

As I was going through all of my winter pictures to decide what I wanted to including in my posts for this A to Z challenge, I started coming across a number of pictures of things partially hidden by mounds of snow and slowly a thought for H came into focus.

We try to bring things inside before the more intense winter weather hits but inevitably each year there are a few items that either by intention, or a lack of time, stay outside and have to brave the elements.  As winter progresses, they start to get more and more hidden by the snow. Continue reading